The Sudan will also help provide technical assistance to Units 3 and 7 in its southern neighbourhood. The ministry has resigned two concession contracts with two gold and mineral mining companies operating in the Red Sea state for the exploration of Block 2A-1 and Block 6K. Minister Abdelrahman said more concession agreements will be signed next week, which amount to 20 agreements. In South Sudan, the administrative structure is largely equivalent to that of Sudan. The Ministry of Petroleum and Mines is responsible for managing South Sudan`s oil sector. The National Petroleum and Gas Corporation (NPGC) is the primary political decision-making and oversight body and reports directly to the President and the National Legislative Assembly. It participates in all segments of the hydrocarbon sector and authorizes, on behalf of the government, oil agreements. Nile Petroleum Corporation (Nilepet) is South Sudan`s national oil company and its activities reflect much of the responsibility of its Sudanese counterpart. Nilepet oversees oil activities and, due to its limited technical know-how and financial resources, holds minority stakes in production participation contracts with foreign oil companies. [8] Sudan`s Transitional Constitution, the Petroleum Act of 2012 and the Petroleum Revenue Management Act of 2013 provide the regulatory framework for the hydrocarbon sector. [9] You also stated that an economic agreement had been reached to resume oil production in South Sudan.

The 2005 peace agreement, which ended the conflict between North and South Sudan, one of Africa`s longest and bloodiest wars, was based on an oil revenue-sharing agreement. However, new evidence, revealed by Global Witness, raises serious questions about the fair distribution of revenues. “If the oil figures released by the Khartoum government are not accurate, the sharing of oil money between North and South Sudan will not be correct,” said Rosie Sharpe, an activist with Global Witness [1]. It had been announced that the two presidents would sign a comprehensive agreement on Wednesday morning, but this was not the case. “The agreement is a great step towards strengthening cooperation between the two countries in the oil and gas sectors in a spirit of brotherhood and cooperation in the interest of both countries,” he said. “Our results do not necessarily mean that Khartoum has defrauded the South for money, but they underscore the need for transparency. If the government of South Sudan and Sudanese citizens are not able to prove that revenue sharing is fair, mistrust will grow and the peace agreement could be jeopardized,” Sharpe said. The ruling elites in Juba, who have strangled South Sudan`s oil sector, are still undecided on how they should maintain future relations with civilians who share power with the military in Sudan`s transitional government and leave open the possibility of future disagreements.

The Government in Khartoum publishes figures on its revenues from the oil industry, but neither the Government of South Sudan nor Sudanese civil society have the opportunity to verify them. . . .